Mathematics instruction at PHS is designed to develop strength in mathematics and to develop skills in both reasoning and problem solving, enabling students to approach questions in other academic areas as well as in life situations logically, rationally and analytically. The curriculum thrust is classical and traditional and at the same time progressive. The instruction is sensitive to the unique needs of the students.

Mathematics Department Goals
Our aim is to empower students mathematically so that they have the ability to explore, conjecture and reason logically as well as have the ability to use a variety of mathematical methods effectively to solve non-routine problems. All students should:

Learn to value mathematics.
Students should have numerous and varied experiences related to the cultural, historical and scientific evolution of mathematics. This will help them to appreciate the role of mathematics in the development of our contemporary society and explore relationships among mathematics and the disciplines it serves: the physical and life sciences, the social sciences and the humanities.

Become confident in their numerical reasoning skills.
As a result of studying mathematics, students need to view themselves as capable of using their growing mathematical power to make sense of new problems and situations in the world around them. Students must understand that doing mathematics is a common and necessary activity.

Become mathematical problem solvers.
The development of each student’s ability to solve problems is essential if he or she is to be a productive citizen. Although some work may be accomplished independently, other work could involve small groups or an entire class working cooperatively.

Learn to communicate mathematically.
The development of a student’s power to use mathematics involves learning the vocabulary of mathematics. This is best accomplished in problem situations in which students have an opportunity to read, write and discuss ideas in which the use of the language of mathematics becomes natural. As students communicate their ideas, they learn to clarify, refine and consolidate their thinking.

Math courses may be taken in the classroom or through our online learning component.

To receive more information about the Math Department please click here.

Class Name Teacher
Pre Calculus
The main goal of Pre-Calculus is for students to gain a deep understanding of the fundamental concepts and relationships of functions. Students will expand their knowledge of quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions to include power, polynomial, rational, piece-wise, and trigonometric functions. Students will investigate and explore mathematical ideas, develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations, and use graphing calculators and mathematical software to build understanding, make connections between representations, and provide support in solving problems. Students will analyze various representations of functions, sequences, and series. Students will analyze bivariate data and data distributions. Students will apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life’s experiences.
Mrs. Anna Dabrowska
Math I
The fundamental purpose of Secondary Mathematics 1 is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas, organized into units, deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Secondary Mathematics 1 uses properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend understanding of geometric knowledge from prior grades. The final unit in the course ties together the algebraic and geometric ideas studied. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.
Math II
The focus of Secondary Mathematics II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Secondary Mathematics 1 as organized into 6 critical areas, or units. The need for extending the set of rational numbers arises and real and complex numbers are introduced so that all quadratic equations can be solved. The link between probability and data is explored through conditional probability and counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships, circles, with their quadratic algebraic representations, round out the course. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.
Math III
It is in Secondary Mathematics III that students pull together and apply the accumulation of learning that they have from their previous courses, with content grouped into four critical areas, organized into units. They apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data, students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles. And, finally, students bring together all of their experience with functions and geometry to create models to solve contextual problems. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problems situations.
Math I Honors
The fundamental purpose of Secondary Mathematics 1 Honors is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas, organized into units, deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Secondary Mathematics 1 uses properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend understanding of geometric knowledge from prior grades. The final unit in the course ties together the algebraic and geometric ideas studied. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. In addition to the core standards, Secondary Math I Honors topics include: represent and model with vector quantities; perform operations on vectors; perform operations on matrices and use matrices in applications.
Math II Honors
The focus of Secondary Mathematics II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Secondary Mathematics 1 as organized into 6 critical areas, or units. The need for extending the set of rational numbers arises and real and complex numbers are introduced so that all quadratic equations can be solved. The link between probability and data is explored through conditional probability and counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships, circles, with their quadratic algebraic representations, round out the course. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. In addition to the core standards, Secondary Math II Honors topics include: complex numbers; matrices; trigonometric expressions and identities; the equations of ellipses and hyperbolas; formulas for the volume of a sphere and other solid figures.
Math III Honors
It is in Secondary Mathematics III that students pull together and apply the accumulation of learning that they have from their previous courses, with content grouped into four critical areas, organized into units. They apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data, students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles. And, finally, students bring together all of their experience with functions and geometry to create models to solve contextual problems. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problems situations. In addition to the core standards, Secondary Math III Honors topics include: graphing rational functions; composing functions; inverse functions; trigonometric functions: symmetry and periodicity of trigonometric functions, solving trigonometric equations using inverse functions, finding all solutions for equations involving trigonometric functions; polar coordinates; arithmetic and geometric series.