In History and Social Sciences, students examine the diverse cultures of the world and the manner in which human beings view themselves in and over time. History includes the study of people, places and environments. History examines how people create and change structures of power, authority, and governance. The Social Sciences include the study of individual development and interactions among individuals, groups and institutions. The study of History includes how people organize for production, distribution and consumption of goods and services. As much as Social Studies examines necessary global connectedness and interdependence, it also reinforces the ideals, principles and practices of American citizenship in a democratic republic and the history of our republic.

Upon graduation students are expected to be able to:

  • Identify the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution and the economic and political roots of the modern world.
  • Identify the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, political reform in Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia and South America.
  • Identify the causes and consequences of World War 1, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, Russian and Chinese Revolutions and the rise in nationalism and political, ethnic and religious conflicts.
  • Identify the historical, intellectual and economic origins of the United States during the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras.
  • Identify the keys ideas of the U.S. Constitution, the basic framework of American democracy, and the basic concepts of American government.
  • Identify Westward expansion, origins of political parties, the growth of sectional conflict ending in the Civil War and Reconstruction.
  • Identify the causes and consequences of the American Industrial Revolution.
  • Identify America’s growing role in world affairs including America’s role in World Wars, the conflicts of the Cold War, and recent diplomatic initiatives.
  • Identify the accomplishments of the Progressives, the New Deal, the Civil Rights Movement and recent trends shaping modern America.

Students of Social Studies will develop historical skills such as analysis of charts, graphs and maps, understanding cause and effect, and identification of historical point of view. Students will examine history with the use of primary source documents.

To receive more information about the Social Studies Department click here.

Class Name
Anthropology
Expand your knowledge of peoples and cultures through the study of family, marriage, art, language, economics, political organizations, social control, and supernatural beliefs.  Enjoy lively class dicussions, real life applications, and plenty of live examples from a variety of cultures throughout the world.  This is your chance to learn to view the world from other perspectives.
B/1 World Civilizations
By the end of the class, students will understand and be able to describe how historical events are part of cause and effect, each event creating consequences that lead to other events throughout world history.  They will also be able point out cultural changes over time and give insight on why cultures have or have not changed at several different points of history. 

Due to the nature of this course, we will be discussing subjects which may be sensitive.  This means we will be looking at cultures and causes and effects from many different points of views.  They include, but are not limited to, many religions and their effects on culture, the German perspective on World War II, and slavery.  These subjects are not approached lightly and will be presented in an objective way.  Discussions on such topics are meant only to have students think about many sides of the events.

B/4 Honors US History
This course covers the periods of Reconstruction to present day American history.  This will include a look at changes in culture, economics, politics, technology, foreign policy, and more.  The goal of this course is to understand cause and effect, and how US history affects us today.

Geography

Section B/2
Geography is described as the study of the "why of the where." Geography for Life will explore how to use geography as a tool to better understand the world in which we live. Students will learn to evaluate and question the why and where of spatial perceptions that are read, seen, and heard. The six standards identified below are best understood when using the following geographic themes: location, place, movement, region, and human-environmental interaction. 

Section C/2
Geography is described as the study of the "why of the where." Geography for Life will explore how to use geography as a tool to better understand the world in which we live. Students will learn to evaluate and question the why and where of spatial perceptions that are read, seen, and heard. The six standards identified below are best understood when using the following geographic themes: location, place, movement, region, and human-environmental interaction.

Section Online
Geography is described as the study of the "why of the where." Geography for Life will explore how to use geography as a tool to better understand the world in which we live. Students will learn to evaluate and question the why and where of spatial perceptions that are read, seen, and heard. The six standards identified below are best understood when using the following geographic themes: location, place, movement, region, and human-environmental interaction.

Online Government

Section One
The goal of this course is to foster informed, responsible participation in public life. Knowing how to be a good citizen is essential to the preservation and improvement of United States democracy. Upon completion of this course the student will understand the major ideas, protections, privileges, structures, and economic systems that affect the life of a citizen in the United States political system. This course is recommended for seniors due to their proximity to voting and draft age.

Section Honors
The goal of this course is to foster informed, responsible participation in public life. Knowing how to be a good citizen is essential to the preservation and improvement of United States democracy. Upon completion of this course the student will understand the major ideas, protections, privileges, structures, and economic systems that affect the life of a citizen in the United States political system. This course is recommended for seniors due to their proximity to voting and draft age.

Online US History
This year-long course covers the periods of Reconstruction to present day American history.  This will include a look at changes in culture, economics, politics, technology, foreign policy, and more.  The goal of this course is to understand cause and effect, and how US History affects us today.
Online World Civilizations
This is a half-year class.  By the end of the class, students will understand and be able to describe how historical events are part of cause and effect, each event creating consequences that lead to other events throughout world history.  They will also be able point out cultural changes over time and give insight on why cultures have or have not changed at several different points of history.